Children who exercise in their early teens can cut the risk of getting diabetes as adults: Study

Children who exercise in their early teens can cut the risk of getting diabetes as adults: Study

New research has found that children who exercise a lot in their early teens can cut the risk of getting Type 2 diabetes as adults. The findings could help design more effective interventions for children by targeting the early teenagers. According to a study conducted by the University of Exeter researchers, physical activity provides the […]

New research has found that children who exercise a lot in their early teens can cut the risk of getting Type 2 diabetes as adults. The findings could help design more effective interventions for children by targeting the early teenagers.

According to a study conducted by the University of Exeter researchers, physical activity provides the greatest benefits to adolescent insulin resistance – which is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes – when the condition peaks at age 13. But exercise may not lower insulin resistance at age 16.

“Our study found that physical activity reduced this early-teenage peak in insulin resistance but had no impact at age 16,” said one of the researchers Brad Metcalf, senior lecturer in physical activity and health at University of Exeter in England.

“We are not saying that 16-year-olds don’t need to be physically active, there are other health benefits to be gained from being active at all ages,” Metcalf pointed out.

For the study, the researchers measured insulin resistance, a condition which leads to high blood sugar and is a precursor to type 2 diabetes, in the same 300 children every year from age 9 through to age 16. The study was set out to determine when and to what extent physical activity in children impacts on insulin resistance and other markers of metabolic health.

The results showed that insulin resistance was 17 per cent lower in the more active adolescents at the age of 13, independently of body fat levels, but this difference diminished progressively over the next three years and had disappeared completely by age 16, when insulin resistance levels were much lower.

“A reduction in this peak could lessen the demand on the cells that produce insulin during this critical period, which may preserve them for longer in later life,” Metcalf said.

The study was published in the journal Diabetologia.

Comments

  1. Marcy T says

    This is the exactly sort of info we need to get out there, especially with parents these days killing their youth with crap lifestyles and worse food. When I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes a year ago, the first thing I did was examine my lifestyle and diet. The ADA diet coupled with my doctor’s Metformin were ineffective, however. Thank goodness I found Max Sidorov’s book the 7 Steps to Health and the Big Diabetes Lie(reviewed here: http://doiop.com/reajshu ) and I’m starting to see incredible results. I’ve dropped 25 pounds slimmed 4 inches off of my waist. I have more energy than ever. I’m glad I decided to give the natural treatments a try before blindly trusting the pharmaceutical companies. Wake up folks, they make their money when we’re sick over a longer period.

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